Amazing Prehistoric Ancestor Of Modern Animal

Kaprosuchus saharicus ancestor of Crocodile

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Kaprosuchus is known from only a single almost complete skull discovered in Niger. This crocodyliform was nicknamed “boar croc” after its unusual caniniform teeth which resemble those of a boar. It has been estimated that Kaprosuchus may have reached lengths of 6 metres. It is thought that this crocodyliform would have been strictly a terrestrial (living on land) animal and certainly a feared predator!

Titanoboa ancestor of snake

TITANOBOA: MONSTER SNAKE

Titanoboa,  meaning “titanic boa,” is an extinct genus of snake that lived approximately 60–58 million years ago, during the Paleocene epoch,a 10-million-year period immediately following the dinosaur extinction event. The only known species isTitanoboa cerrejonensis, the largest, longest, and heaviest snake ever discovered, which supplanted the previous record holder,Gigantophis. By comparing the sizes and shapes of its fossilized vertebrae to those of extant snakes, researchers estimated that the largest individuals of T. cerrejonensis found had a total length of around 12.8 m (42 ft) and weighed about 1,135 kg (2,500 lb; 1.1 long tons).

Megatherium prehistoric ancestor of sloth

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Megatherium  from the Greek mega [μέγας], meaning “great”, and therion [θηρίον], “beast”) was agenus of elephant-sized ground sloths endemic to South America that lived from the late Pliocene through the end of the Pleistocene. Its size was exceeded by only a few other land mammals, including mammoths and Paraceratherium.

Helicoprion prehistoric ancestor of shark

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Helicoprion is a long-lived genus of extinct, shark-like eugeneodontid holocephalid fish. Almost all fossil specimens are of spirally arranged clusters of the individuals’ teeth, called “tooth whorls.” Helicoprion first arose in the oceans of the late Carboniferous310 million years ago, survived the Permian–Triassic extinction event, and eventually became extinct during the Early Triassic,250 million years ago. The closest living relatives of Helicoprion (and other eugeneodontids) are the chimaer

Deinotherium Prehistoric ancestor of elephants

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Deinotherium (“terrible beast” derived from the Ancient Greek δεινός, deinos meaning “terrible” and θηρίον, therion meaning “beast”) was a large prehistoric relative of modern-day elephants that appeared in the Middle Miocene and survived until the Early Pleistocene. During that time it changed very little. In life, it probably resembled modern elephants, except that its trunk was shorter, and it had downward curving tusks attached to the lower jaw.

Gigantopithecus

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Gigantopithecus (from the Ancient Greek  “giant”, and “ape”) is an extinct genus of ape that existed from perhaps nine million years to as recently as one hundred thousand years ago, in what is now Nepal, China, India, and Vietnam, placing Gigantopithecus in the same time frame and geographical location as several hominin species. The fossil record suggests that individuals of the species Gigantopithecus blacki were the largest known apes that ever lived, standing up to 3 m (9.8 ft), and weighing up to 540 kg (1,190 lb)
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The Man Problem

“Doctor,” the embarrassed man said, “I have a sexual problem. I can’t get it up for my wife anymore.

“Mr. Thomas, bring her back with you tomorrow and let me see what I can do.”

The next day, the worried fellow returned with his wife. “Take off your clothes, Mrs. Thomas,” the medic said. “Now turn all the way around. Lie down please. Uh-huh, I see. Okay, you may put your clothes back on.”

The doctor took the husband aside. “You’re in perfect health,” he said. “Your wife didn’t give me an erection either.”

Deep Sea Creature You Don’t Know Exist

Frilled Shark

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Humans rarely encounter frilled sharks, which prefer to remain in the oceans’ depths, up to 5,000 feet (1,500 meters) below the surface. Considered living fossils, frilled sharks bear many physical characteristics of ancestors who swam the seas in the time of the dinosaurs. This 5.3-foot (1.6-meter) specimen was found in shallow water in Japan in 2007 and transferred to a marine park. It died hours after being caught.

 

Giant Spider Crab

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Thought to be the largest arthropods on Earth, giant spider crabs spend their time foraging on the ocean floor up to a thousand feet (300 meters) deep. These rare, leggy behemoths, native to the waters off Japan, can measure up to 12 feet (3.7 meters) from claw tip to claw tip. This five-foot (1.5-meter) specimen was photographed in Japan’s Sagami Bay.

 

Atlantic Wolffish Pair

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The sinister-looking Atlantic wolffish makes its home in the rocky coastal depths up to 1,600 feet (500 meters) below. Reaching 5 feet (1.5 meters) long, wolffish have conspicuous dentition suited to a diet of hard-shelled mollusks, crabs, and sea urchins. This mated pair was found in a deep-sea den off the coast of Maine.

 

Fangtooth Fish

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The nightmarish fangtooth is among the deepest-living fish ever discovered. The fish’s normal habitat ranges as high as about 6,500 feet (2,000 meters), but it has been found swimming at icy, crushing depths near 16,500 feet (5,000 meters). Fangtooth fish reach only about six inches (16 centimeters) long, but their namesake teeth are the largest, proportionate to body size, of any fish.

 

Vampire Squid

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Vampire squid is an apt name for a creature that lurks in the lightless depths of the ocean. Comfortable at 10,000 feet (3,000 meters) below the surface, these diminutive cephalopods navigate the blackness with eyes that are proportionately the largest of any animal on Earth. The species gets its name from its dark, webbed arms, which it can draw over itself like a cloak. It occupies the mesopelagic and bathypelagic regions of temperate and tropical world oceans. The animal’s physiology has adapted to enable it to live at the very low oxygen levels found within the oxygen minimum layers of these regions.

 

Pacific Viperfish

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The Pacific viperfish has jagged, needlelike teeth so outsized it can’t close its mouth. These deep-sea demons reach only about 8 inches (25 centimeters) long. They troll the depths up to 13,000 feet (4,400 meters) below, luring prey with bioluminescent photophores on their bellies.

Wolffish

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An orthodontist’s dream, an Atlantic wolffish displays the hardware it uses to crush mollusks, shellfish, and sea urchins. These tough-looking predators swim as deep as 2,000 feet (600 meters) and range from the Scandinavian coast to Cape Cod to the Mediterranean.